Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (ITN)

Early stage researcher

Kathrine Maxwell

Kathrine Maxwell

MSc in Geology

Institute:
Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT), Germany

Topic:
Greenhouse reef accretion

Supervisor(s):
Prof. Hildegard Westphal and Dr. Alessio Rovere

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Depositional modelling and sequence stratigraphy of greenhouse Pliocene reefs

Kathrine Maxwell is a geoscientist based at the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT) in Bremen, Germany. She completed a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and a Master of Science in Geology at the University of the Philippines in Quezon City, Philippines.

Her research interests revolve around understanding past sea-level and land-level changes through the investigation of fossil sea level indicators such as coral reef terraces. For her PhD research, she will employ geologic, geomorphic, and geospatial techniques to examine Pliocene reefs as an analogue for potential future greenhouse conditions. She aims to shed new light on the dimension and geometry of carbonate bodies, lateral dimensions of facies belts, and paleo-water depth.

Publications

  • Maxwell KV, Ramos NT, Tsutsumi H, Chou YC, Duan F, Shen CC (2018) Late Quaternary uplift across northwest Luzon Island, Philippines constrained from emergent coral reef terraces. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 43(15): 3114-3132. doi: 10.1002/esp.4474
  • Ramos NT, Maxwell KV, Tsutsumi H, Chou YC, Duan F, Shen CC, Satake K (2017) Occurrence of 1 ka-old corals on an uplifted reef terrace in west Luzon, Philippines: Implications for a prehistoric extreme wave event in the South China Sea region. Geoscience Letters 4(1): 12. doi: 10.1186/s40562-017-0078-3
  • Ramos NT, Maxwell KV, Payot BD, Pacle NAD (2015) Application of the analytic hierarchy process and GIS in susceptibility mapping of earthquake-triggered landslides: A case study of Bohol Island, Central Philippines. Proceedings of the 36th Asian Conference on Remote Sensing: 6.

Blogs by Kathrine Maxwell: